Research in Germany

Germany is a top destination for PhD students, postdocs, and senior scientists. The website "Research in Germany" helps you to find your way to Germany, to seek for PhD positions, research jobs or funding opportunities. It describes the German research landscape and helps you plan your career and life in Germany. Welcome to Germany - the Land of Ideas!

Two female researchers are standing in a large solar centre at the DLR Jülich.

Why Germany

There are many good reasons for doing research in  Germany. It is one of the most innovative, stable and well endowed  research nations  and its universities and research institutions are among the best in the world. Values like freedom and diversity as well as social and ecological responsibility are considered important to ensure knowledge gain and societal progress.

Explore

Your goal

Current developments & news

Find more

Here you will find a selection of the latest R&D news from German universities, non-university research institutes and industrial research facilities.

First insights into the genetic bottleneck characterizing early sheep husbandry in the Neolithic period

Mitogenetic diversity of sheep did not decline in the Anatolian distribution area of wild sheep when sheep husbandry developed in the early Neolithic c. 10,000 years ago, as previously assumed. SNSB and LMU zooarchaeologist Prof. Joris Peters and collaborators could show that matrilineal diversity remained high during the first 1,000 years of human interference with sheep keeping and breeding in captivity, whilst only declining significantly in the course of the later Neolithic period. The results of their study are reported in the journal Science Advances.
Apr 12, 2024, 10:30:00 PM

Researchers shed light on the molecular causes of different functions of opioid receptors

Thousands of people around the world die every day from overdoses involving opioids such as fentanyl. Drugs that target opioid receptors sometimes have severe side effects. An international team of researchers has taken a closer look at the molecular mechanisms of these active substances. The research, carried out by Dr Matthias Elgeti, a biophysicist at Leipzig University, in collaboration with research groups from the US and China, has now been published in the journal Nature.
Apr 12, 2024, 5:37:44 PM

Revolutionising grading: IU study reveals AI potential for fairer assessment

Large-scale IU study demonstrates the potential of AI in enhancing grading fairness
Apr 12, 2024, 3:06:39 PM

Global research team finds no clear link between maternal diabetes during pregnancy and ADHD in children

An international research team led by the University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) and with participation of the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim/Germany has just provided valuable evidence through a 20-year longitudinal study to address the longstanding debate concerning the potential impact of maternal diabetes on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. This study, analysing real-world data from over 3.6 million mother-baby pairs in Hong Kong, New Zealand, Taiwan, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, showed that maternal diabetes during pregnancy is unlikely to be a direct cause of ADHD. The findings of this groundbreaking study were published in Nature Medicine.
Apr 12, 2024, 2:10:12 PM

Innovative Antiviral Defense With New CRISPR Tool

The rise of RNA viruses like SARS-CoV-2 highlights the need for new ways to fight them. RNA-targeting tools like CRISPR/Cas13 are powerful but inefficient in the cytoplasm of cells, where many RNA viruses replicate. Scientists from Helmholtz Munich and the Technical University Munich (TUM) have devised a solution: Cas13d-NCS. This new molecular tool allows CRISPR RNA molecules that are located within the nucleus of a cell to move to the cytoplasm, making it highly effective at neutralizing RNA viruses. This advancement opens doors for precision medicine and proactive viral defense strategies. The findings were published in Cell Discovery.
Apr 12, 2024, 1:05:25 PM

No two worms are alike - New study confirms that even the simplest marine organisms tend to be individualistic

Sport junkie or couch potato? Always on time or often late? The animal kingdom, too, is home to a range of personalities, each with its own lifestyle. In a study just released in the journal PLOS Biology, a team led by Sören Häfker and Kristin Tessmar-Raible from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) and the University of Vienna report on a surprising discovery: even simple marine polychaete worms shape their day-to-day lives on the basis of highly individual rhythms. This diversity is of interest not just for the future of species and populations in a changing environment, but also for medicine.
Apr 11, 2024, 10:00:00 PM

First insights into the genetic bottleneck characterizing early sheep husbandry in the Neolithic period

Mitogenetic diversity of sheep did not decline in the Anatolian distribution area of wild sheep when sheep husbandry developed in the early Neolithic c. 10,000 years ago, as previously assumed. SNSB and LMU zooarchaeologist Prof. Joris Peters and collaborators could show that matrilineal diversity remained high during the first 1,000 years of human interference with sheep keeping and breeding in captivity, whilst only declining significantly in the course of the later Neolithic period. The results of their study are reported in the journal Science Advances.
Apr 12, 2024, 10:30:00 PM

Researchers shed light on the molecular causes of different functions of opioid receptors

Thousands of people around the world die every day from overdoses involving opioids such as fentanyl. Drugs that target opioid receptors sometimes have severe side effects. An international team of researchers has taken a closer look at the molecular mechanisms of these active substances. The research, carried out by Dr Matthias Elgeti, a biophysicist at Leipzig University, in collaboration with research groups from the US and China, has now been published in the journal Nature.
Apr 12, 2024, 5:37:44 PM

Revolutionising grading: IU study reveals AI potential for fairer assessment

Large-scale IU study demonstrates the potential of AI in enhancing grading fairness
Apr 12, 2024, 3:06:39 PM

Global research team finds no clear link between maternal diabetes during pregnancy and ADHD in children

An international research team led by the University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) and with participation of the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim/Germany has just provided valuable evidence through a 20-year longitudinal study to address the longstanding debate concerning the potential impact of maternal diabetes on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. This study, analysing real-world data from over 3.6 million mother-baby pairs in Hong Kong, New Zealand, Taiwan, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, showed that maternal diabetes during pregnancy is unlikely to be a direct cause of ADHD. The findings of this groundbreaking study were published in Nature Medicine.
Apr 12, 2024, 2:10:12 PM

Innovative Antiviral Defense With New CRISPR Tool

The rise of RNA viruses like SARS-CoV-2 highlights the need for new ways to fight them. RNA-targeting tools like CRISPR/Cas13 are powerful but inefficient in the cytoplasm of cells, where many RNA viruses replicate. Scientists from Helmholtz Munich and the Technical University Munich (TUM) have devised a solution: Cas13d-NCS. This new molecular tool allows CRISPR RNA molecules that are located within the nucleus of a cell to move to the cytoplasm, making it highly effective at neutralizing RNA viruses. This advancement opens doors for precision medicine and proactive viral defense strategies. The findings were published in Cell Discovery.
Apr 12, 2024, 1:05:25 PM

No two worms are alike - New study confirms that even the simplest marine organisms tend to be individualistic

Sport junkie or couch potato? Always on time or often late? The animal kingdom, too, is home to a range of personalities, each with its own lifestyle. In a study just released in the journal PLOS Biology, a team led by Sören Häfker and Kristin Tessmar-Raible from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) and the University of Vienna report on a surprising discovery: even simple marine polychaete worms shape their day-to-day lives on the basis of highly individual rhythms. This diversity is of interest not just for the future of species and populations in a changing environment, but also for medicine.
Apr 11, 2024, 10:00:00 PM
Find more

Pinned topics Back to top

A woman is showing a man something on a computer.
On-site consultation
A garden gnome with a welcome sign
Plan your Stay
View of planet Earth through a porthole on the International Space Station (ISS).
From Space to Life
A young woman with identity document at terminal for flight booking or entry
EU blue card in a nutshell
A female scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics is presenting a formula on a blackboard to her colleagues.
Success stories

Upcoming events

Find more
01.04. – 24.05.
MAY 2024 ONLINE
Women in Entrepreneurship program - Part I
17.04. – 21.04.
APR 2024 RIO DE JANEIRO AND SÃO PAULO / BRAZIL
Postdoc in Germany | Seminar and Online Matchmaking
Find more