Highlights

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships

Through its Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships, the European Commission supports experienced researchers wishing to spend a limited period of time working abroad. The next closing date for applications is 14 September 2016. More Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships

Illuminating research in many different fields

Illuminating research in many different fields

Innovative cancer medicine, superfast internet, quick and easy payments at the supermarket checkout: none of these would be possible without light. Numerous scientists in Germany are researching light and its possible uses. More Illuminating research in many different fields

Grants from the Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard-Foundation

Grants from the Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard-Foundation

Through its grants, the Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard-Foundation supports talented young female researchers with children, giving them the flexibility and mobility they need to pursue an academic career. The next closing date for applications is 30 November 2016. More Grants from the Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard-Foundation

Number of the Month: 600,000

Number of the Month: 600,000

That’s how many people work in research and development in Germany. Never before have there been so many jobs in this field in Germany, as the “Federal Report on Research and Innovation 2016” confirms. More Number of the Month: 600,000

Research opportunities for physicists

Research opportunities for physicists

Martha Liliana Cortés Sua is doing her PhD at Technische Universität Darmstadt and conducting research at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research. She explained to us why she chose Germany as the place to do her research, how she covers her living expenses and where she met the stars in her field. More Research opportunities for physicists

Researching light

Researching light

We take it for granted in our everyday lives – and yet it is a miracle. Without light the Earth would be uninhabitable and life unthinkable. Researchers in Germany are investigating the phenomenon that is light, its origins and the possibilities it offers. In this edition we present a number of exciting ideas and projects. You can also read why a young physicist is so enthusiastic about doing a PhD in Germany, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month. Newsletter: August 2016 Researching light