Newsletter 2018

October 2018: Biomedical engineering

From prosthetics to regenerated organism 640x360

In the future, bypass operations and donor organs may become a thing of the past. Biomedical engineering has a clear vision: it wants to grow living tissue, cells and organs in the lab. You can also read in this edition what a young American studies expert has found out about conspiracy theories, and why muscles improve men’s career prospects. And last but not least, you can learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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September 2018: Climate research

Research in the permanent ice

Heatwaves, violent storms, drought – climate change is very much evident in the increasingly extreme weather around the globe. Top researchers in Germany are studying all aspects of the climate. You can also read in this edition why the Bronze Age makes an American archaeologist optimistic about the future, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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August 2018: Digital humanities

Digital humanities: the rise of a new academic discipline

The digital humanities have already digitised some important collections of texts, but this new discipline is able and keen to do a lot more. In this edition, you can also read about an Italian mathematician who is researching a promising new theory, find out why a computer scientist believes that hunting for a parking space will soon be a thing of the past, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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July 2018: Nanotechnology

Tiny particles, fifty thousand times thinner than a human hair, could soon facilitate the targeted treatment of diseases. Nanotechnology researchers are exploring the potential industrial applications of this material and how it could be used in medicine. You can also read in this edition how a Lithuanian cancer researcher met Swedish chemistry Nobel prize winner Tomas Lindahl at the Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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June 2018: Innovative enterprises

Open for business, thanks to science and research

Small and medium-sized enterprises are the engine that drives many national economies, including Germany’s. Engaging with scientists and researchers helps them stay innovative. You can also read about a young biologist from Ukraine who is using bats to study climate change, find out from a geophysicist what the deep sea has to do with the Alpine mountains, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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May 2018: Health research

Researching for the sake of health

Health can be a very personal matter, though it also affects entire societies. Professional healthcare and modern therapies also play a part in stability and growth. In this edition we report on the current state of research in Germany and show how an idea can be turned into an effective product. You can also read how a young man from Yemen became one of Germany’s best-known science communicators, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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April 2018: Empirical education research

Better education for all

Education plays a key role in how our future will turn out – determining not only our individual life opportunities, but also society’s wellbeing. In this edition we present trends in empirical education research in Germany. You can also read how a Dutch psychologist is researching how political attitudes can be changed, learn about current funding programmes, discover our number of the month and find out how an avatar can help us prepare for a job interview.

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March 2018: Mobility research

How do I get from A to B? If only it were that simple! But growing cities and climate change demand new transport solutions. In this edition we present trends in mobility research in Germany. You can also read how an innovative start-up culture is supported at German universities, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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February 2018: Working worlds of the future

What will work be like in future? Will we in fact work at all? "Working Worlds of the Future" is the focus of Science Year 2018 – in this edition we present some research and exciting projects. You can also read how career centres at German universities support young academics with their career planning, learn about current funding programmes and discover our number of the month.

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January 2018: Museology

Germans love museums with their fascinating exhibitions and eclectic collections, and museology is now an established field of study. In this edition you can also read how a young researcher is improving satellite images, learn about current funding programmes, discover our number of the month and find out how much Neanderthal DNA we have in our genes.

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